Hurricane page of the Tuna Point Lighthouse, Faro De Punta Tuna, Maunabo, Puerto Rico
TUNA POINT LIGHTHOUSE
Working to attain and reconstruct the Tuna Point Light House                             "Faro De Punta Tuna"
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Current weather at the Lighthouse
This site is dedicated to the lighthouse restoration and lighthouse preservation of the Punta Tuna lighthouse.  This USCG Lighthouse is considered part of the National Park Service, as it is one of the Puerto Rico National Historic Lighthouses.  It is known but many names including, Tuna Point lighthouse, Point Tuna lighthouse, Faro de Punta Tuna, and Maunabo lighthouse.  The Point Tuna Lighthouse is located in Maunabo, Puerto Rico and this site contains, lighthouse pictures, lighthouse photos, lighthouse blueprints, lighthouse facts, lighthouse images from space, weather at the lighthouse, Maunabo weather and weather for all of Puerto Rico.  There is also detailed information, on the Maunabo Wetland area.
Click on the globe below to fly to the lighthouse on Google Earth
Punta Tuna
Punta Tuna
Hurricanes are severe tropical storms that form in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Hurricanes gather heat and energy through contact with warm ocean waters. Evaporation from the seawater increases their power.
Hurricanes in general
Hurricanes rotate in a counter-clockwise direction around an "eye." Hurricanes have winds of at least 74 miles per hour. When they come onto land, the heavy rain, strong winds and heavy waves can damage buildings, trees and cars. The heavy waves are called a storm surge. Storm surges are very dangerous and a the major reason why you MUST stay away from the ocean during a hurricane.
Puerto Rico and Hurricanes
Because of its location, you would think that Puerto Rico would be hit often by hurricanes, but in reality a decade can go by without one coming close.   Punta Tuna however is in a prime location for impact and has taken near and direct hits several times. 

The documentation of hurricanes in Puerto Rico starts with the arrival of Christopher Columbus to the island in November 19th, 1493. Even though the island was "discovered" that year, the first Spanish settlement in Puerto Rico was established years later by Juan Ponce de León. This is the reason that the first official records of hurricanes passing through Puerto Rico do not really start until the first decade of the 1500s. From that time on we have records of hurricanes in Puerto Rico until the present times.

The number of hurricanes that have hit Puerto Rico over the more than 5 century's would cover pages and pages so for our purposes here, we will deal with those storms impacting the Punta Tuna Lighthouse and the Maunabo area.  For those interested in greater detail on all the storms hitting Puerto Rico, there is a book, "History of Hurricanes in Puerto Rico" by Edwin Miner Solá.  A condensed list of storms is at the bottom of this page, for those interested.
Entered the island by Patillas 10 miles to the west of Tuna Point at 7-8 pm and left Puerto Rico by 3am in Isabela.  This places the initial impact point 10 miles to the west of Tuna Point, meaning the strongest winds and conditions were at the lighthouse. The storm was estimated to have sustained winds of 115 mph at time of landfall . San Juan got 29.17 in/hg (987mb) pressure and winds of 55 mph with rains of 2.36 inches. This is the first storm were flags were used to warn people of a storm coming, this was done in the government offices. The hurricane damaged the railroads very badly.
1899, August 8th; Hurricane "San Ciriaco"
This hurricane has some records that are hard or impossible to break:

1) The last hurricane of the 19th Century.

2) First hurricane with Puerto Rico under the control of USA.

3) The natural disaster that has killed most people in Puerto Rico's history; 3,369 deaths.

4) The storm that has caused more rain in 24 hours with a total of 23.00 inches in Adjuntas.

5) First hurricane with a rain map in Puerto Rico and the first under the National Weather Service (NWS) in Puerto Rico.

San Ciriaco formed near the Cape Verde Islands and crossed the Atlantic towards the Antilles, then moved towards the United States turning east over the North Atlantic towards Europe. The hurricane made landfall in southeast Puerto Rico almost on top of the Tuna Point lighthouse at around 8am with estimated sustained winds of 140-145 mph and a pressure of 27.75 in/hg or 939 millibars leaving the island around 2pm in the vicinity of Aguadilla. The storm's hurricane wind radius of 80-85 nm and the rain area was of around 385 nm. Pressure in San Juan was of 29.17 in/hg (987mb) and rain totals of 6.37 inches. In Mayaguez the winds picked up to 112mph and a pressure of 28.86 in/hg (977mb). In 48 hours an average of 10.1 inches of rain was estimated for the entire island. That is the normal rain rate of 2 summer months in Puerto Rico. During the hurricane a total of 890 people died and 1,294 were drowned. Some injured died later and the total was elevated to 3,369 deaths. Damage estimates to property were a total of $35,889,013. 

In the Town of Maunabo almost all the houses were destroyed and "La Bordalez" sugar refinery was demolished, putting many of the people in the town out of work.

In the article "La marejada ciclónica de San Ciriaco" or "The Storm Surge of San Ciriaco" it is mentioned the deadly storm surge that entered in the area of Humacao near one mile inland in some places with the winds coming from the east (onshore) in the northern eyewall of the storm. Storm surge estimates are of at least 15 feet in the area which has places like Punta Santiago which are several feet below sea level and were entire families were lost in the storm and were never found after. San Ciriaco was the deadliest storms in Puerto Rico and is also on record as one of the strongest to hit the island and still more than a century after its passage is a storm that deserves to be studied in every aspect.
1956, August 12th, Hurricane Betsy (Santa Clara)
In another identical strike to the 1893 storm, where Tuna Point gets the brunt of the impact, Hurricane Betsy developed from a tropical wave in August 9th east of the Lesser Antilles. The storm rapidly strengthened reaching hurricane status reaching an estimated peak of intensity of sustained 120mph (105 kts) winds and weakening before passing over the island of Dominica and very near the southwest of Guadeloupe in the afternoon of August 11th. At this time the storm was estimated to have winds of 90 to 110 mph. The hurricane continued moving straight to Puerto Rico making landfall in the southeast of the island by the town of Patillas at 8 AM AST August 12th. The intensity of the hurricane at this time was estimated to be at 90 mph and the storm was moving at a fast forward speed of 21 mph with an eye of 14 nm in diameter. In only 3 hours the eye of the hurricane crossed Puerto Rico leaving the island by Arecibo (north coast) at 11 AM AST August 12th. San Juan reported winds of 92 mph, a pressure of 29.56 in/hg (1001 mb) and rain totals of 3.19 inches. Ramey AFB in Aguadilla reported sustained winds of 85 mph with a gust of 115 mph. The highest rainfall report was in Rio Grande with 8.70 inches. After passing over Puerto Rico, Betsy continued in a northwest track strengthening back to category 2 intensity and re-curving northeastward into the open waters of the Atlantic losing its tropical characteristics as it moved into cooler waters by the 20th of August.

Damage made by "Santa Clara" in Puerto Rico was bad in the southeast, central and northern areas of the island, the hurricane did not impact very much the southwest side. A total of 16 peopled died in the storm and 15,000 houses were destroyed. Damage estimates are of $40,000,000 dollars. This is the first hurricane that was tracked in radar as it crossed Puerto Rico.
We wish to thank the National, Hurricane Center, José M. García, the National Weather Service Forecast Office in San Juan, The University of Puerto Rico and Elyunque.com without who's help this page would not be possible.
Hurricanes at Tuna Point
1893, August 16th-17th; Hurricane "San Roque"
1928, September 13th; Hurricane "San Felipe II"
This hurricane in its impact is very similar to that of the 1893 hurricane.  Its center hits to the west of Maunabo and the lighthouse, this leaves the Punta Tuna to withstand what any weather person will tell you is the worst part of the storm with the highest winds and worst rains.

This is considered one of the most intense hurricanes in the history of the Antilles and the strongest in Puerto Rico's history. This infamous hurricane developed in the area of the Cape Verde Islands reported in September 6th. Moving generally in a westerly direction for the next few days, the storm strengthened into hurricane intensity and further increasing its force passed over the island of Guadeloupe the afternoon of September 12th with sustained winds estimated to be near 125 mph (110 kts) and a reported pressure in the island of 940 millibars. As the storm entered the Caribbean Sea it continued to strengthen becoming a category 5 intensity (Saffir-Simpson Scale) hurricane.

"San Felipe" made landfall in Southeast Puerto Rico in the vicinity of Guayama-Arroyo at around 2 PM AST September 13th with officially estimated sustained winds of 160 mph and a measured pressure in Arroyo of 27.50 in/hg or 931 millibars (It is not known if this pressure was actually measured in the eye). For the next eight to ten hours the eye of the hurricane crossed Puerto Rico from southeast to northwest without losing much strength, still with category 5 intensity when it left the northwest side of the island in the vicinity of Aguadilla at around 10-11 PM AST September 13th. The wind report from San Juan was of sustained 160 mph at around 1 PM AST before the instrument was destroyed by the winds. Stronger winds were probably felt after the instrument was destroyed, these were the highest sustained winds ever reported in Puerto Rico. As the official intensity estimates are 160 mph (140 kts) when the storm hit Puerto Rico, there are estimates of sustained winds in the area of 180-200 mph were the strongest part of the eyewall passed over, which was the southeast coast of the island. Damage surveys in the aftermath of the storm reveal that there was catastrophic destruction all around Puerto Rico, but that the towns which were directly in the path of the eye and strongest part of the eyewall were literary "blown" off of the map. This was the case in places like Guayama, Maunabo all the way north to Naguabo and westward. The storm was also very big as estimates are of hurricane conditions in Guayama during 18 hours ( 4 am-10 pm September 13th) and San Juan during 12 hours ( 4 am-4 pm September 13th). Rain reports were of 29.60 inches of rain in 48 hours.

After blasting Puerto Rico the hurricane continued in a west-northwesterly direction over the Bahamas Islands as a category 4 storm finally making landfall in the vicinity of West Palm Beach, Florida in the night of September 17th with estimated sustained winds of 150 mph (130 kts) and a measured pressure of 929 millibars. The storm made catastrophic damage in Florida also causing a storm surge in Lake Okeechobee showing the massive size and power of the storm, at least 1,800 deaths were caused by the storm in that state. The storm moved further inland into Florida and the eastern side of the United States while finally dissipating near the Great Lakes area in September 20th.

As mentioned above, Puerto Rico was devastated by the storm and the towns were the eye passed directly over were the worst affected with many places becoming unrecognizable after the event. At least 312 deaths were related to the hurricane. Damage estimates are of $50,000,000 dollars (Which for that time was a very high amount). A total of 24,728 houses were completely destroyed and 192,444 were severely affected. Almost no building in Puerto Rico survived the hurricane without any damage. Many sugar cane factories which were new at that time and were valued at millions of dollars were reduced to debris by the hurricane. The coffee crops were all lost and coffee was imported to Puerto Rico from 1929 to 1934 to satisfy local demand. The economy of Puerto Rico which was struggling before the hurricane was further affected by it and it took more than a decade to recuperate entirely from the effects of this infamous storm which to the date, is the strongest hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in it's history.

In the Town of Maunabo almost all the houses were destroyed, the Columbia sugar refinery, the catholic and protestant churches, and most of the agricultural wealth of the municipality lies in ruins.
1964, August 23rd; Hurricane Cleo
In a near miss, Hurricane Cleo formed east of the Lesser Antilles moving in a westward track in August 20th. During the next few days the storm strengthened until reaching hurricane intensity and blasting Guadeloupe with winds of 130-135 mph sustained on August 22nd. After that, Cleo continued in a westward track passing 100 nm south of Puerto Rico with winds of 155 mph causing minor damage and with winds of 52 mph reported at Punta Tuna, Maunabo. The hurricane passed just south of Barahona, Dominican Republic and over southwestern Haiti as a category 4 hurricane, weakening and crossing Eastern Cuba the eye of Cleo moved over South Florida as a rapidly strengthening category 2 hurricane with winds of 105 mph and a pressure of 968 millibars. The Cleo re-curved inland over the North Carolina area and moved out into the ocean were it regained hurricane intensity finally dissipating east of Nova Scotia on September 5th.
2004, September 15th; Tropical Storm Jeanne:
Tropical Storm Jeanne developed from a rather weak tropical wave that crossed the Atlantic Ocean and organized quite rapidly just east of the Leeward Islands. The first advisory was issued by the National Hurricane Center during the day of the 13th and a tropical storm had formed in the 14th as the system was slowly moving over the Leeward Islands. Jeanne found favorable upper-level winds and continued to strengthen becoming nearly a hurricane when landfall occurred at around midday AST in the 15th near Maunabo, Puerto Rico with an official intensity estimate of 60 kts (70 mph) sustained winds.
For the next 6 to 8 hours the center of the storm crossed Puerto Rico exiting the island near Arecibo but finally emerging out in the ocean near Aguadilla in the night of the 15th. Jeanne was the worst hurricane to hit Puerto Rico since hurricane Georges in 1998. Wind damage specially in the eastern side of the island was moderate with many trees down, power lines and poles, signs blown out and some roofs of houses and businesses that were damaged. Flooding was also experienced throughout the island and storm surge flooding was reported in Humacao and Yabucoa. The entire island at one point was left without power but this was mainly due to a mistake made by operators of the electric system, even with that, the areas affected worst by the wind were nearly one week without power as it was the case in places like southern Caguas. The highest wind report was an unofficial report of 63 mph sustained winds in Salinas with a peak gust of 71 mph. San Juan reported sustained winds of 49 mph with a peak gust of 71 mph. Hurricane conditions may have been experienced in the area north of the center of the storm, specially from Yabucoa northward to Naguabo and the high elevations. The highest rainfall amount reported was in Vieques with 23.75 inches of rain storm total.

This storm proved to be a hazard to the government and people due to its rapid intensification just prior to affecting the area with preparations completed the same morning that the cyclone hit the island.

After hitting Puerto Rico, Jeanne officially became a hurricane and made landfall near Punta Cana, Dominican Republic with winds of 70 kts (80 mph), then the hurricane weakened over land causing catastrophic flooding in Haiti where over 2,900 people died in the area of Gonaives. Then Jeanne emerged as a tropical depression and moved northward over the Atlantic and was influenced again by a strong mid-surface ridge that made it turn in a loop back towards the west as it deepened back to hurricane intensity making landfall in Abaco Island, Bahamas early in the 25th with winds of 100 kts (115 mph) and late in that day and early in the 26th over Stuart, Florida with winds of 105 kts (120 mph). Damage in both the Bahamas and Florida was widespread mainly due to the fact that hurricane Frances hit the same area just two weeks earlier.
Damage from hurricane "San Ciriaco"
Tropical storms and Hurricanes which passed within two degrees of latitude of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands from 1515 to present.

1515, July Exact date unknown. Caused death of many Indians in Puerto Rico.
1526, October 4 Great damage in Puerto Rico.
1527, October 4 Affected Puerto Rico. 
1530, July 26, August 23, August 31 These three storms within 6 weeks blew down half the houses in San Juan, P.R. and unroofed the remainder. Many cattle drowned.

1537, July and August Three hurricanes within 2 months in Puerto Rico; exact dates unknown. Many slaves and cattle drowned.

1568, August 24 Affected Puerto Rico.
1575, September 21 Severe Hurricane, known as San Mateo I in Puerto Rico.
1615, September 12  The most severe hurricane to affect Puerto Rico in 40 years. (This suggests that other tropical storms may have occurred between 1575 and 1615).

1738, September 12 Affected Puerto Rico.
1740, August Affected Puerto Rico; exact date unknown.
1751, August 18  Affected Puerto Rico.
1767, August 7 Plantations destroyed and livestock drowned in Puerto Rico.
1772, August 28 Affected Puerto Rico.
1780, October 14 Probably the most devastating hurricane of record up to this date. It is known as "The Great Hurricane". Passed over southwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.

1785, September 25 A furious hurricane that passed over Puerto Rico.
1788, August 16 Seriously affected Puerto Rico.
1804, September 21 This great hurricane known as San Mateo II, remained in the memory of Puerto Ricans for a very long time.

1807, August 17-19 Severe hurricane from the east lasted 50 hours in Puerto Rico.
1812, July 23, August 21  Seriously affected Puerto Rico.
1813, July 23 Affected Puerto Rico.
1814, July 22-23 Affected Puerto Rico.
1816 A violent hurricane passed over Puerto Rico; exact date unknown.
1818, September 22 Seriously affected Puerto Rico.
1819, September 22 Very destructive in Virgin Islands and severe in Puerto Rico.
1825, July 26-27 A very violent hurricane, known as Santa Ana, which was very destructive in Puerto Rico.
1827, August 18-19 Very destructive hurricane crossed Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1827, August 28 Affected Virgin Islands severely, especially St. Thomas.
1830, August 11-12 Severely affected St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
1835, August 13 Crossed Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.
1837, July 31 Severely affected St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
1837, August 2-3 A violent hurricane, known as Los Angeles, struck St. Thomas and skirted the northeastern coast of Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.

1840, September 16 Severely affected Puerto Rico.
1846, September 12-13  Passed by northeastern corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1851, August 18-19 A violent hurricane, known as Santa Elena,(also known as San Agapito) skirted the south coast and crossed the southwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction. 

1852, September Affected Puerto Rico; exact date unknown.
1867, October 29 The most violent hurricane in many parts of Puerto Rico, known as San Narcisco. Accounts indicate it was a was a storm of small diameter and rapid movement. Also affected St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands where 1,000 lives were lost.

1876, September 13 A violent hurricane known as San Felipe I. It struck St. Thomas and skirted the south coast of Puerto Rico.

1889, September 3  A very destructive hurricane in St. Thomas. It passed east of the U.S. Virgin Islands in a SE to NW direction.

1891, August 19-20  Hurricane crossed eastern Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1893, August 16-17 Hurricane passed Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.
1896, August 31- September 1 Hurricane crossed southwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1898, September 21-22  Tropical Storm crossed northeastern Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.
1899, August 7-8 Disastrous hurricane known as San Ciriaco, crossed Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.

1900, August 30- September 1  Tropical storm skirted south coast of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.
1900, October 24-26 Tropical storm crossed southwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1901, July 6-8 Hurricane crossed southwestern Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1901, September 11-13 Tropical storm skirted north coast of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1901, October 8-10 Tropical storm crossed northeastern corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1903, July 19-20 Tropical storm crossed Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.
1908, September 9-10 Hurricane passed off north coast of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.
1908, September 26-27 Tropical storm passed off south coast of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.
1909, November 12-13 Tropical storm passed off northwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a WSW to ENE direction.

1910, August 24-25 Tropical storm passed off south coast of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.
1910, September 6-7 Hurricane skirted south coast of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.
1915, August 10-12 Hurricane skirted south coasts of St.Croix , U.S.V.I. and Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.
1916, July 12-14 Tropical storm passed through Virgin Islands in a SE to NW direction.
1928, September 13 Devastating Hurricane San Felipe II passed through Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1931, August 17 Tropical storm crossed Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1931, September 10-11  Violent hurricane known as San Nicolas, passed through Virgin Islands and skirted north coast of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction causing destruction along a strip 10 to 12 miles wide.

1932, September 26-27 Destructive hurricane, known as San Ciprian, passed through Virgin Islands and across Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.

1933, July 25-26 Tropical storm passed just northeast of Virgin Islands in a ESE to WNW direction.
1933, September 27-28 Tropical storm passed within 1o latitude south of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.
1934, August 21-22 Tropical storm passed within 2o latitude south of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.
1934, September 18 Tropical storm passed within 2o latitude northeast of Virgin Islands in a SE to NW direction.

1937, August 24-25 Tropical storm passed within 2o latitude northeast of Virgin Islands in a ESE to WNW direction.

1938, August 8 Tropical storm passed through Virgin Islands and skirted north coast of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.

1939, August 7 Tropical storm apparently developed about 1o latitude northeast of St. Thomas in the U.S.V.I. and moved northwestward.

1940, August 5 Tropical storm passed just north of St. Thomas in the U.S.V.I. in a ESE to WNW direction.
1942, November 4 Tropical storm apparently developed just off southeastern Puerto Rico and crossed the northeastern part of the island in a ESE to WNW direction.

1943, August 13-14 Tropical storm passed just northeast of St. Thomas in the U.S.V.I. in a ESE to WNW direction.

1943, October 14 Hurricane passed between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico in a S to N direction.
1944, July 12-13 Tropical storm apparently developed just off the northwest corner of Puerto Rico and moved northwestward.

1945, August 3 Tropical storm passed within 1o latitude of the southwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.

1945, September 12-13 Hurricane passed within 2o latitude north of the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.

1947, October 16-17  Tropical storm passed just northeast of St. Thomas in the U.S.V.I. in a SE to NW direction. 

1949, September 2-3 Tropical storm developed between Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands and moved northwest, reaching hurricane intensity and changing course to northward after passing 20o N latitude on the 3rd day.

1950, August 23 Tropical storm passed over the southwest corner of Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction.
1953, September 14 Tropical storm Edna passed within 1o latitude northeast of the Virgin Islands in a SE to NW direction. 

1954, August 30-31 Tropical storm Dolly formed just off the northwestern corner of Puerto Rico and moved off in NNW direction.

1955, January 3 Hurricane Alice passed within 1o latitude southeast of St. Croix in the U.S.V.I. in a ENE to WSW direction.

1955, September 11-12 Tropical storm Hilda passed within 1o latitude north of St. Thomas in the U.S.V.I. in a ESE to WNW direction reaching hurricane intensity on the 12th.

1956, August 11-12  Hurricane Betsy (Santa Clara) crossed Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1958, September 13-14 Tropical Storm Gerda passed about 1o latitude from southwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a ESE to WNW direction

1959, August 18-19 Tropical Storm Edith passed within 1o latitude south of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands from a E to W direction.

1960, September 4-6 Hurricane Donna passed within 1o latitude from St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
1961, October 2-3 Hurricane Frances passed within 1o latitude from the southwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction

1963, September 26-27 Hurricane Edith headed due N toward the southwestern tip of Puerto Rico and then turned due W just before making land.

1964, August 22-23 Hurricane Cleo passed within 2o latitude south of Puerto Rico from a E to W direction.
1965, August 28-29 Tropical Depression turned into Tropical Storm Betsy within 2o latitude E -NE of U.S. Virgin Islands in a S to N direction. Shortly afterwards it became Hurricane Betsy.

1966, August 26 Hurricane Faith passed about 1o latitude northeast of the Virgin Islands in a E-SE to W-NW direction. 

1966, September 28 Hurricane Inez passed about 1o latitude south of Puerto Rico and St. Croix in a E to W direction.

1967, September 9-10 Hurricane Beulah passed within 1o southwest of southwestern corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.

1973, September 3-4 Tropical Storm Christine weakened into a tropical depression before passing over the northern U.S. Virgin Islands and just northeast of the NE tip of Puerto Rico. It dissipated shortly afterwards.

1974, August 29-30 Tropical Depression developed into Tropical Storm Carmen as it passed about 1o south of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.

1975, September 15 Tropical Depression developed into Tropical Storm Eloise just as it reached within 1o north of the northeastern tip of Puerto Rico as it passed in a E to W direction.

1979, July 17-18 Tropical Storm Claudette passed over northern U.S. Virgin Islands and weakened to a Tropical Depression just as it hit the northeast coast of Puerto Rico. It then traveled right along the northern coastline of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.

1979, August 30 Hurricane David passed about 1o latitude south of Puerto Rico in a E-SE to W direction.

1979, September 3-4 Tropical Storm Frederic passed over St. Croix and then traveled right along the southern coast of Puerto Rico in a E to W direction.

1981, September 4 Tropical Storm Floyd passed within 1o latitude of northern U.S. Virgin Islands in a SE to NW direction.

1981, September 8  Tropical Storm Gert passed just near St. Croix and then over the northeast corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.

1984, November 6-7 Tropical Storm Klaus passed just between Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in a SW to NE direction.

1987, September 22 Hurricane Emily passed almost 2o latitude southwest of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.

1988, September 10 Tropical Storm Gilbert turned into Hurricane Gilbert as it passed about 2o latitude south of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.

1989, August 3-4  Hurricane Dean passed almost 2o northeast of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction. 

1989, September 17-18 Hurricane Hugo passed over St Croix...then Vieques and Culebra and the northeast corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.

1990, October 7 Tropical Storm Klaus passed just northwest of northern U.S. Virgin Islands in a E-SE to W-NW direction.

1993, August 16 Tropical Storm Cindy passed almost 2o southwest of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction.
1995, September 5-6 Hurricane Luis passed just north of U.S. Virgin Islands in a SE to NW direction.
1995, September 15-16 Hurricane Marilyn passed over St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands in a SE to NW
direction.

1995, October 23-24 As Tropical Storm Sebastien passed within 1o latitude southeast of U.S. Virgin Islands it weakened to a tropical depression and then dissipated just SE of Puerto Rico as it moved in a NE to SW direction.

1996, July 8-9 Hurricane Bertha passed just northeast of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in a SE to NW direction.

1996, September 9-10 Hurricane Hortense passed over the southwest corner of Puerto Rico in a SE to NW direction. 

1997, September 5-8 Hurricane Erika passed about 2o latitude northeast of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in a SE to NW direction.

1998, September 21-22 Hurricane Georges passed over St Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands and then entered Puerto Rico near Humacao and traveled through the interior of the island exiting just south of Mayaguez in Cabo Rojo. The hurricane traveled mainly in an E to W direction.

1999, October 20-21 Tropical Storm Jose passed within 1o latitude to the northeast of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in a E-SE to W-NW direction and then turned N-NE once in the Atlantic to the north of our local islands.

1999, November 16-18 Hurricane Lenny passed within 1o latitude to the south of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands in a W to E direction and then eventually turned E-NE over the northern Leeward Islands and into the Atlantic.

2000, August 21-23 Hurricane Debby passed just north of St Thomas and within 1o latitude to the northeast of Puerto Rico in an E-SE to W-NW direction.

2001, August 22-23 Tropical Storm Dean formed from a tropical wave over the Virgin Islands on August 22nd and a Hurricane Hunter plane indicated winds near hurricane force later that day. The system encountered an unfavorable environment the next day north of Puerto Rico and weakened to a tropical wave. Winds to tropical storm force were reported in the U.S. Virgin Islands and there was an estimated $2 million in damage due to flooding in Puerto Rico.

2004, September 15-16 Tropical Storm Jeanne passed just south of St Croix and then entered southeast Puerto Rico near Maunabo and traveled west then north and west again across Puerto Rico and exited over the northwest tip of the island near Aguadilla.

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Path of hurricane "San Ciriaco"
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Hurricane
Hurricane
Click on the globe below to watch a hurricane preparedness video (originally made for Florida, but good information for anywhere)

Isabela
Aguadilla
Quebradillas
Not Available Camuy Arecibo Barceloneta Manati Vega Alta Bayamon San Juan Carolina Rio Grande
Cayo Icacos
Fajardo
Rincon Not Available
Punta Puerca
Naguabo
Mayaguez Humacao
Puerto Real
Yauco Yabucoa Punta Guayanes
Cabo Rojo
Parguera Guanica Punta Verraco Punta Cuchara Playa de Ponce Santa Isabel Salinas Central Aguirre Guayama Punta Tuna

 
Vieques Image
Culebra Image
Below find an interactive map of the Puerto Rico coastline.  Just click on your location to find the Storm Surge potential map for your area.  Once the page opens, select your area of interest on the next page that opens, enlage that map by clicking the enlage button in the lower right corner to see greater detail.
The Enlarge button you will see appears to the right.  It will appear in lower right corner on the following page after you click on the link below and load the map.